Overview


Topic:
S2R-OC-IPX-01-2020
Total Project Value:
€ 250 000,00
Duration:
from 01/11/2020 to 31/10/2021
S2R (Of H2020) co-funding:
€ 250 000,00
Coordinator:
Luisa Martinez Muneta
UNIVERSIDAD POLITECNICA DE MADRID
Complementary projects:

Objectives


Topic:
S2R-OC-IPX-01-2020
Total Project Value:
€ 250 000,00
Duration:
from 01/11/2020 to 31/10/2021
S2R (Of H2020) co-funding:
€ 250 000,00
Coordinator:
Luisa Martinez Muneta
UNIVERSIDAD POLITECNICA DE MADRID
Complementary projects:

An increasing and fierce global competition oblige European companies to put all their talent and resources into the conception of novel products and business models with added value to capture the existing market opportunities. Innovation is considered as the main tool to keep the industrial and economic leadership of Europe towards the world. In this sense, a myriad of sectors and industrial activities contribute to reach that goal and the Transport Sector arises as one of the backbones that will pavement the growth of the European industry and the European society welfare. The reasons behind providing such a relevance to Transport are several. However, to highlight the most relevant, can be mentioned the quality of its industry -manufacturing, operation, maintenance, etc.- and that it directly empowers people to move and developed their lives and the economic activity. 

Putting focus on the industrial perspective, specifically from manufacturing and OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturers), Europe is a leader in manufacturing light and heavy-duty terrestrial vehicles (e.g. Daimler, BMW, PSA, FIAT) as well as rail stock (e.g. Siemens, Alstom, CAF, Talgo) and aircrafts (e.g. Airbus) which are supplied by hundreds of Tier 1, 2 and 3rd-entities, which nurture a business fabric which is -among others- the backbone of our social wealth, job creation and brings uncountable benefits. On the other hand, hosting such industrial capacity offers European citizens the privilege to benefit from innovations faster -even decades earlier than other territories-. As matter of a fact, Spain is the second country with most High-Speed Railway kilometres, worldwide, and their major suppliers are European (e.g. Talgo, CAF, Siemens, Alstom). 

Nevertheless, securing a place as global innovator requires more than deepen and reinforcing existing industries, supply chains or specific technology innovations. Also, it means to lead the path on disruption. Embracing the creation of new paradigms where technology is transforming entire industries and sectors. For the case of transport, hyperloop represents that disruption. Decades after the last major disruption, a new -the fifth- mean of transport is about to be delivered into the market. European talent is ahead in the competition, hosting four out of the six most promising companies in the race to develop hyperloop. Companies such as Zeleros (Spain), Hardt (The Netherlands), NEVOMO (Poland) and Transpod (Canadian based in France) – partners of HYPERNEX consortium- are fully dedicated developing each’s singular vision of hyperloop. However, the mission of bringing hyperloop into a reality can be only completed with the support of a robust R&D and industrial fabric, along with the support of regulators and standardization bodies and associations. Therefore, Europe needs HYPERNEX as the ignitor of this movement, consolidating the links among stakeholders participating along the hyperloop value chain. 

Therefore, the overall challenge to be faced by Europe, in reference to the Transport Sector, is to keep its existing leadership in mature industries linked to mature modes of transport, while expands those capabilities taking advantage of disruptions caused by new technologies such as the represented by hyperloop. Achieving this means to provide major stakeholders (e.g. Tier 1, 2, 3 industries, integrators, R&D centres, regulators, etc.) that could potentially participate in the hyperloop value chain with the relevant information to get prepared (e.g. buying new manufacturing machines, training their personnel, updating their supply chains, etc.) to cover those needs once hyperloop becomes a reality. The opportunity for Europe relies on the fact that, for most of the subsystems and technology fields in which hyperloop relies (e.g. levitation, propulsion, light materials, etc.), there is already strong intellectual and industrial capacity that can be devoted to accelerate hyperloop. However, today, those entities are dedicated to other sectors such as Railway, Aviation, Energy Systems, etc. as they are not AWARE of the hyperloop technical needs and also the revenue potential of a market valued at USD 1.35 Billion in 2022 that is expected to reach USD 6.34 Billion by 2026, at a CAGR (Compound annual growth rate) of 47.20% between 2022 and 20261. This implies that Europe needs much lower initial investment to launch hyperloop than other regions that need to create the value chain from scratch. 
 






















Challenge 1:
Europe needs to keep itsleadership in transport industry by means of developing capacity on noveldisrupting means of transport (i.e. hyperloop) that have the potential todisplace the existing ones (mainly regional plane routes and terrestrial high-volumepassenger routes). There is a need for a migration of talent, technologies,industrial capacities and standardization guidance into hyperloop industry.

HYPERNEX goalis to become the seed that will facilitate the inception and growth of a multibillionhyperloop market industry in Europe. Achieving that will require, initially, tounderstand and define the main features in terms of operation and technologyspecifications of the hyperloop system. Later, will be necessary to identify,recruit and orchestrate existing capacities that are currently allocated tosupport other industries and adapt them so in a short period will have thepotential of bringing key expertise also to hyperloop industry. This strategyaims to accelerate the market readiness of for the creation of suchinfrastructure as well as creating the best value for money for Europe and itscitizens. This will be possible because Europe would become the best option forhyperloop roll-out and will also develop industrial capacity to supply the restof the world with European technology.

Challenge 2: Europe needs to tackle theclimate change crisis my minimizing its GHG emissions. This is why the EuropeanGreen Deal makes sense and should act as a driver and inspiration to everyinitiative developed in Europe. Even more dealing with Transport, one of thetop polluting segments and one of the most promising in terms of fulldecarbonization (e.g. electricity and hydrogen powered mobility).


In2015, the Paris Agreement was signed. According to this, 195 countriesincluding the EU, agreed to commit to limit global warming to 1.5ºC. In orderto achieve this goal, the EU must reach zero net GHG emissions by 2040. In thiscontext, transport represent almost 25% of the Europe’s GHG emissions. As aresult, the European strategy is clear: Speeding the development oflow-emission alternative transport and moving towards zero-emission vehicles.HYPERNEX aims accelerate the development of hyperloop, an energy efficientsolution based on direct zero emission. According to the statement made by theEuropean Commission in the white book, the development of new technologies forvehicles will be key to lower transport emission in the EU as in the rest ofthe world. HYPERNEX brings the opportunity of developing a solution capable ofachieving aviation speeds, on demand and propelled by renewable-power sources.Therefore, hyperloop is a key tool for transport segment decarbonization inEurope.

Challenge3: Thehistory of transport means such as Railway have demonstrated how relevant is tobring a broad perspective on interoperability when the routes andinfrastructures are planned. The classic case of ERTMS calls for anticipationto avoid interoperability issues at least within the Common European Market.With all these lessons learned, hyperloop deployment must incorporate theinteroperability spirit from its inception. Therefore, makes sense to work froman EU perspective in terms of standardization of the operation, evolving into aunique, interoperable hyperloop infrastructure that would be supplied byhyperloop pods by several OEMs.

 

European member States are working, under the umbrella of theEuropean Commission and its agencies, towards the design and deployment of amore integrated infrastructures. Thinking from an isolated, single State,perspective does not allow taking advantage of the European vision andcapacity. The synergies that can be created incorporating high integrationlevels and allowing interoperability are massive. Due to this rationale, turnsmandatory to incorporate existing works and plans into the conception of noveltransport means such as hyperloop. The Single European Railway Area (SERA) is anotable example of integration and interoperability effort for Railway that canfeed hyperloop route planning in Europe. A relevant example is theTrans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) policy that addresses theimplementation and development of a Europe-wide network of railway lines, roads,inland waterways, maritime shipping routes, ports, airports and railroadterminals. The ultimate objective is to close gaps, remove bottlenecks andtechnical barriers, as well as to strengthen social, economic and territorialcohesion in the EU2. Therefore, hyperloop should incorporate all those existinganalysis and plan to accelerate its deployment, as it would eventually coverseveral of the infrastructure needs already identified in those plans.


Strategic and technical objectives 

In order to achieve its goal, HYPERNEX has set two strategic objectives. They will be evaluated based on specific Key Performance Indicators (KPI) with a strategic or technical nature: 

OBJECTIVE 1: To reinforce the competitiveness of European SMEs, start-ups and large industrial players currently working in the hyperloop sector. More intensively, to support SMEs, Universities, R&D Centres, Standardization and Regulation Bodies that are now operating in alternatives segments (Railway, Aviation, Aerospace, etc.) showing them the opportunity that hyperloop represents, guiding them on how they can be part of hyperloop ecosystem providing their expertise and, finally, to de-risk possible investment plans as HYPERNEX depicts a long term perspective on hyperloop. 

KPI 1 = Number of entities (SMEs, R&D centres, etc.) approached and impacted by HYPERNEX’s results dissemination activity (target is 200 European entities) 

KPI 2= Number of entities incorporating hyperloop as a future strategic opportunity, including the allocation of resources to initiate specific strategies and investments. (target is at least 50 entities) 

KPI 3 = Investment mobilised by entities into the hyperloop opportunity (5-year plan) (target is 100M€) 

KPI 4 = Number of potential new jobs created in 5 years in the hyperloop industry and propelled by HYPERNEX activities (target is at least 2000 potential new jobs) 

KPI 5 = Number of current strategic infrastructure plans (e.g. TEN-T) where hyperloop is incorporated into the main strategy (target 3 platforms) 



Results and Publications

At the moment there are no publications available.
This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No: 101015145